The Church and God’s Law (50)

Conclusion              

What went wrong with the American experiment in Christian freedom? Essentially, the same thing that has been going wrong with Christianity since the early second century: a compromise with false gods. It began in the early church with the assumption that the false gods of Greek philosophy spoke to man with the same common language and message that the God of the Bible speaks. This intellectual error has continued to undermine all attempts to construct Christian civilisation ever since. [1]                      

Christians must begin to take responsibility for the state of the Church and the nations, and begin to initiate change to the glory of God. This much is true: we have inherited religious, philosophical and ideological “influences from the east” (Isa.2:6) which have affected us detrimentally; “wild gourds” (II Kings 4:38-41) which the Church has glibly thrown into the cooking pot, and now we have belatedly realised, “…O man of God, there is death in the pot.” Like trusting children, we’ve taken the path of least resistance, failing to understand that

                    the path of least resistance makes men and rivers crooked.

What are these “influences from the east”? The natural law of the Greeks and Romans, along with humanistic philosophy. Right back at the beginning, Christians began grafting concepts of law and philosophy into the Church that were derived not from scripture, but from the traditions of humanistic men. And because all law is religious in nature, we’ve paid an enormous price for this error.

Our Lord made some fundamental observations to the Sadducees which are of singular importance to us today. He said to them, “You are mistaken, not understanding the scriptures nor the power of God” (Mat.22:29). This teaches us: error will come from one of these two sources.

Could it be that the most serious errors in the Church today, have come about because we haven’t understood the scriptures? I’m sure that this is the case.

Reconstruction of an old building with faulty foundations begins with a lot of “grunt-work.” The steady process of identifying those aspects of the edifice that must be removed, painstakingly getting these things out of the building, and replacing them with what the architect determined from the beginning were his chosen components.

Josiah found out this much: his father Amon and grandfather Manasseh had done evil in God’s sight. He discovered he had a massive reform and reconstruction task to undertake in Judah, and it all began when the book of the law was found in the house of the Lord (II Chron.34:14-19).

We have to go back to the blueprints, and say to ourselves, “How must we do this?”

This is a Church matter where we cannot be guided by humanists, who have a vested interest in getting an outcome that will serve them.

Conclusion:                                                                                                                                    

It’s time to stop blaming the devil, the past and others. We have taken the soft options, the path of least resistance for too long. The time has come for us to be accountable to God for what we leave to the next generations.

The Biblical description of the righteous man is this: “The law of his God is in his heart; his steps do not slip” (Ps.37:31).

Let us arise and build.


[1] Gary North, “Conspiracy in Philadelphia,” p.239.